Frequently Asked Questions

Appendix A: Standardized Contract

Download Appendix A

Who is the Customer in these forms? 
The customer is the person whose name appears on your electric bill. If there are two names on the bill provide only one on the forms.

Where do I get my Account Number? 
You can find your account number on your electric bill.

Why are you asking for my email address?
It is often much faster to exchange information about your interconnection application utilizing the internet than it is to contact you by phone. If you prefer to exchange information by FAX, also include your FAX number in the field provided.


Appendix B: Standardized Application 0 -5 MW Inverter Based Systems Compliant with UL 1741

Download Appendix B

When do I need to complete Appendix B?
You complete Appendix B for interconnection applications for single phase distributed generation systems 25 kW or smaller. We may consider interconnection of certified inverter based distributed generation systems above 25 kW up to 200 kW under the expedited application process outlined in Smart Grid SGIP Section I.B. Applications for these systems should include a fully completed Appendix C.

Who is the Agent?
The Agent is the individual or company you are authorizing us to share information about your specific interconnection application. This individual or company may also be your installing contractor. The agent will sign Appendix B.

Who is the Consulting Engineer or Contractor?
The Consulting Engineer or Contractor is an individual or company that either you or your agent has engaged to provide support for your specific interconnection application. If this is the same as your Agent and you do not wish to identify any additional consultants or contractors you should leave these fields blank.

What is the estimated service date? 
This is the date when you expect to have the system fully installed and inspected by the wiring inspection agency having jurisdiction where the system is installed. This is also the date you expect to request us to make any metering changes necessary to meter your system.


Appendix C: Standardized Application for Non-Inverter Based System 0 - 5 MW

Download Appendix C

Who needs to complete Appendix C? 
You would need to complete Appendix C for interconnection applications for generation systems larger than 25 kW. We may consider interconnection of certified inverter based distributed generation systems above 25 kW up to 200 kW under the expedited application process outlined in Smart Grid SGIP Section I.B. Applications for these systems should include a fully completed Appendix C.

Who is the Agent?
The Agent is the individual or company you are authorizing us to share information about your specific interconnection application. This individual or company may also be your installing contractor. The agent will sign Appendix C.

Who is the Consulting Engineer or Contractor?
The Consulting Engineer or Contractor is an individual or company that either you or your agent has engaged to provide support for your specific interconnection application. If this is the same as your Agent and you do not wish to identify any additional consultants or contractors you should leave these fields blank.

What is the estimated service date?
This is the date when you expect to have the system fully installed and inspected by the wiring inspection agency having jurisdiction where the system is installed. This is also the date you expect to conduct the testing specified under the Standardized Interconnection Requirements.


DG High Voltage FAQ's

What is High Voltage?
Our Range A ANSI voltage is 114v – 126v. Any actual supply voltage in this range is acceptable. DG system inverters, in order to export power, must raise their AC output voltage to a few volts above the actual utility supply. This might trigger a trip of the inverter on “high voltage” while the utility voltage is within ANSI Range A. As on example, if the actual utility voltage at an installation is 121v, the inverter may boost its output to 124v, and operate fine. If, however the utility supply is 125v, the inverter may boost its output voltage to 128v, and this may trigger a false “utility high voltage” alarm and trip.

The "high voltage" being reported by the inverters coming offline, sometimes as "utility high voltage" is actually the voltage incremental increase by the inverter itself, in an attempt to export to the utility, reaching a level where it triggers its own high voltage protection and comes offline.

What are some of the common causes High Voltage? 
Cases of inverters coming offline are much more likely, and aggravated, if there are multiple inverters at one location or on one transformer secondary. This is because while one inverter raises its output voltage to export power, and stays online, the companion inverter now tries to raise its output voltage to a level higher than the other inverter, and the companion inverter will trip on “utility high voltage.”

Further aggravating the issue for some inverter cases is the distance the inverter is from the main building electric panel. The inverter raises its output voltage even more to overcome the impedance of the interconnecting branch circuit romex wiring run. Therefore, it is always recommended that the DC wire run from the PV panel array (or windmill or other DG source) be longer as necessary to enable the inverters to be as close as possible to the main circuit breaker panel. DC wire installations have fewer losses than AC wire runs.

In one instance where a homeowner emailed that his APC UPS unit was indicating it was "protecting his electronic equipment from high supply voltage," that high voltage was not our ANSI Range A voltage being supplied, but the voltage bump up by a DG inverter.

What is the remedy for High Voltage?
We will not sanction tampering with inverters in order to raise their output voltage tolerance and keep them from tripping offline when they drive their own output voltage too high. This would be a threat to equipment in that building and other buildings served by the same transformer. A variety of customer loads can suffer damage with actual voltage in the building being excessive.

If a DG system technician suspects that our supply voltage is high (over the allowable ANSI Range A voltage, 114v – 126v), We should be informed. We will visit the installation revenue meter location and take voltage readings. We will also check the area supply voltage at the substation. As long as the voltage at the test location is </= 126v, We consider the voltage to be within range and normal.

Who do I contact for High Voltage issues?
Power Asset Management (PAM)
PAMSolarLI@pseg.com
516-949-7004


Remote Net Metering

What is the process for submittal, review and implementing Remote Net Metering?
The Overall Process, Technical Review and Billing Procedure can be viewed HERE.